Tag Archives: nostalgia

One of these days

“One Of These Days
When We Both Are At Our Ease
When You’ve Got Time To Please Yourself
See What’s Right And See What’s There
And Breathe Fresh Air, Ever After”
Paul McCartney sings – One of these days

How often do we say “One of these days I will. …whatever”? or “When I get around to it”?  Well I want to tell you that today should be ‘one of these days”.  None of us know how many more days there are to do whatever we think we want to do.  As someone who was left without ‘one of these days’ I now feel the loss of those days.  We were fortunate in that there weren’t  any things unsaid or undone between us when my husband died, but there cannot be anymore ‘one of these days’.

Do you have a bucket list with all the things you think you want to do before you die?  But have you thought of all the smaller things that maybe you should do?

  • Have your told your spouse/partner how much they mean to you and how much you appreciate their just being there for you?  – What if tomorrow never comes will they know how much they mean to you?
  • Have you told your children how proud of them you are ?
  • Have you told them how much you love them?
  • Have you told them no matter what they do you will still love them?
  • Have you thanked your parents for your childhood?  I know some people had awful childhoods so delete this question if it doesn’t apply to you.
  • Have you told those special friends how much you appreciate their support?
  • Have you thanked your children’s spouses for the love and care they have shown to your children?
  • Have you told your grandchildren that if you had to choose you would choose them?

So often we attend funerals ( and we attend so many more when you reach this  vast number of years)  and hear great eulogies about how wonderful the dead person was.  How many people told that person of their love and respect while they were still alive and could appreciate it?  Wouldn’t it make so much more sense to do so?

So determine that from today you wont put off doing these small things and here for you today is a round tuit.

A Round Tuit

So now you have no excuse for putting anything off until ‘one of these days’ or ‘when I get a round tuit’.  You now have one!  Use it as often as you like.  It can never be over used or worn out.

So today look at the list of things you want to say to others, look at what you might regret if you don’t do so before that special person dies, and as the ad says ‘Just Do It!”

And for me – I want to say thank you to all who follow and read my blogs.  It has been something to do ‘one of these days’ .  Well today is the day so thank you.

Thanks

“On behalf of all the people who have assembled here
I would merely like to mention, if I may
That our unanimous attitude
Is one of lasting gratitude
For what our friends have done for us today
And therefore I would simply like to say
Thank you very much, thank you very much
That’s the nicest thing that anyone’s ever done for me.”  From Scrooge the musical

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Christmas Is Coming

Christmas goose
“Christmas is coming and the geese are getting fat
Please put a penny in the old man’s hat
If you haven’t got a penny, a ha’penny will do
If you haven’t got a ha’penny, then God bless you!”
I have talked/written before about growing up in London during and after the Second World War.
During those years, Christmas was a very special occasion.  Not for us the mad consumerism that is rampant now – there was very little to buy.  But what happy memories I have of those days.
In memory, it always seemed to snow on Christmas Day.   We would rise early to see what had been left in the stockings and pillowcases at the foot of our beds.  Our stockings always held an orange.  A rare treat in those days when one couldn’t buy fruit from around the world or fruit out of season.  I don’t know where these came from.  In the stocking would also be several small things.  Maybe a bar of chocolate or a packet of sweets, remembering that sweets were rationed during and after the war.
Ration books

via Wikipedia

Rationing was introduced in June 1940 and ended in July 1954 as was phased out gradually over five years beginning in 1948.   Sweet and sugar rationing continued until 1953.  For more on rationing click here

Our pillowcases were the next to be explored.  There would be a book, puzzle or game that we had commented on during the preceding weeks.  Perhaps a gift from a particular aunt or uncle would also be included but no bright wrapping paper.  Just the presents in the pillowcase.

Then when we would all have breakfast together.  I don’t think this was any special breakfast the way we have now.  Just the normal fare with perhaps eggs or bacon if the ration stretched that far.

The three of us girls would then go to church for the Christmas service.  I know that Mother didn’t come having been raised in the Jewish faith, but I don’t remember Father being there either.  However, once church was over Father would take us on the bus to visit his Father and family.  This was always a good time – but no presents were exchanged – just the fun of having so many cousins all together.

Cooked goose

Back then to our house for Christmas dinner.  This was always goose, never turkey.  I don’t know how they managed this with rationing, and perhaps my memory is playing tricks.  Perhaps it was only in later years that we had goose.  But I have never eaten goose anywhere but in my parents’ house and if I think hard, I can conjure up the smell of it cooking.  In fact, I can smell it now!

The afternoon was spent as a family, playing the games we had received as presents, or everybody reading their new book.  There would be imported dates and is this is the only time I can remember having dates as a child, dates always remind me of Christmas.

How simple and innocent were those Christmases so many years ago.  No mad rushing around the shops for all the presents; Father and Mother bought a gift for each of us only.  I don’t recall their ever having bought a gift for each other.  Perhaps their gift was seeing the happiness of their three small daughters.

We certainly wouldn’t want to return to those days of austerity, but often, in the midst of the hurry and scurry for Christmas, I think back to those more simple days and am glad that I experienced them.

“I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round, as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys.”
Charles Dickens.

Christmas tree

Image via Wikipedia

Flat Packs

One of the bloggers that I follow is Hallysan at Photographic Memories.  In a recent blog acknowledging an award, she had to give us seven things about herself.  One was that she was good with her hands and that caused me to comment that I was not and flat packs send me into a spin.

I remember one particular time when a flat pack was in order.  I had arrived in London in time for Christmas and was staying with my sister.  A few days before Christmas Day a flat pack arrived by courier.  My sister had ordered a toy kitchen for one of her grand-daughters.

 

We opened the package and saw how many pieces needed to be put together, so in the hope that her son would turn up in the next few days, we closed the box and put it aside.

The days passed and Christmas Eve arrived but her son didn’t, so we were faced with putting this toy together.  The first warning read “Not to be assembled by anyone under 10 years” (or words to that effect).  Then there were the usual warnings about small items and small children but hey – we were two adult, grown-up Grandmothers.  We could do this!

My sister is much better with her hands than am I – in fact both sisters are and it would be hard to find anyone who wasn’t.  So she would put the pieces together ie build the kitchen and I would read the instructions and pass the requisite screws, screw-driver, stickers, parts etc.  We were doing very well until I turned over two pages in the instruction book.  Yes, there was a book and it had been translated into English from Chinese, we think by Goofy and his pals.  It made hilarious reading.  I wish I had known the Good Greatsby then and his command of Chinglish it would have been very useful.

Imagine this.  Two adult women surrounded by pieces of a toy kitchen, screws, stickers etc and having no idea how to put it all together.  Hours passed in discussion on how to do this, interspersed with shrieks of laughter when first one thing and then another either didn’t fit or hallelujah it did fit!

Then telephone calls to nieces and nephews in London, to family and friends in New Zealand and to elder sister in Los Angeles.  They all shared in the hilarity and passed comment and advice while we tried to put this danged thing together.

My mobile phone bill reached an all-time high and we did too.  Eventually, a rather wobbly kitchen was put together but my nephew commented the next day that one of the panels was in upside down or round the wrong way, but the four-year-old for whom it was intended loved it anyway.

So no more flat packs for me.  I enjoyed the exercise of putting it together but oh dear me, at the end of it we were left with about thirty extra screws.  I wonder where they were meant to go?  And I never enquired as to how long the kitchen stayed upright.  I left shortly after Christmas and it never came up in conversation again.

As I have said before sisters are the best friends and they are also the best people with whom to share such an experience.


“A hug is a great gift – one size fits all, and it’s easy to exchange.” Author Unknown

Cider House Rules

Dr Larch and Homer Wells

Dr Larch and Homer Wells

Filling in a couple of hours on a cold, spring day, I turned the television on and watched Cider House Rules.  This was shown on a channel that regularly screens older movies.

It’s a 1999 movie starring (Sir) Michael Caine and  Tobey Maguire.  Maguire plays Homer Wells an orphan who was adopted and returned twice to the orphanage that is directed by Dr Wilbur Larch (Michael Caine).

Dr Larch is a secret abortionist and is also addicted to ether which he applies to himself on a regular nightly basis. Homer Wells has no formal education but Dr Larch trains him in obstetrics and abortions and he becomes Larch’s assistant.

The story follows Homer Wells growing up in the orphanage and becoming unsettled, wanting to see the world.  The opportunity arises when an airman arrives with his lady friend who will have an abortion.  The airman agrees to take Homer with him and arranges a job on his family’s apple orchard.  The apples are picked by a team of itinerant pickers and then they are turned into cider.  Homer bunks with these pickers and as they can’t read, reads them the Cider House Rules.

I don’t want to give away any more of this movie.  But would say that if you haven’t seen it, it is well worth a trip to the movies or to get on video.

Having seen this movie I remembered seeing photos of a Cider House in a book that my father gave me years ago.

Book cover

The book is entitled Rural London and was published way back in 1951.  It contains fantastic photos of parts of London way back then.  There is a chapter on East and South-east London and I remember some of scenes as they were when I was growing up in the east end of London.

But the cider house.

At the time the book was published there were three “hostelries” in London that differed from all other pubs in that they sold only cider.

Cider house

The Goat Tavern in Stafford Street

The Goat Tavern still stands in Stafford Street, off Old Bond Street.  The building probably dates back to the end of the seventeenth century.

goat tavern

The Goat Tavern today

We are told that the Goat Tavern is ‘female friendly’ and ‘gay friendly’.  Well, that’s a relief!

Men in cider house

Men drinking in cider house

The “hostelry” pictured above was in the Harrow Road and was formerly a carpenter’s shop that held a  licence that allowed only the workmen to drink on the premises.

This book is one of three that I am delving into at present.  Reading is not the correct word because I read something in one and then remember seeing something of a similar nature in one of the others.

3 books

And I am grateful that I have these books only one of which is relatively new. The other two Rural London and Mayhew’s London are both now tattered and well worn but are great to reread and learn about my home town in years gone by.


“I feel sorry for people who don’t drink.  When they wake up in the morning, that’s as good as they’re going to feel all day.”
Frank Sinatra

For my sisters

Plaque

Anonymous quote

I have written about my sisters before, but in case you don’t know, the three of us live in different parts of the world.  If we tried we couldn’t be further away from each other.  Christine, my elder sister is in Los Angeles, USA; Marianne my younger sister is in London, UK and I am in Wellington, NZ.

We were born and brought up in the East End of London.  Some of you may have seen the TV program “The East Enders” but real life was not like that.  We lived in a comfortable, loving environment surrounded by parents and relatives.  In this we were particularly fortunate as since growing up and moving on I have heard horrendous stories of how people were treated during their formative years.  When I read this post on Fatherhood from Misty it made me realize once again just how lucky we were.

As I have said before there was little money around and certainly no luxuries.  But we were well fed, clothed and warm and in this loving environment, what more could we ask for?

My childhood memories are good.  I had my two best friends always close by and if any one of us was ever in trouble, we ganged together and put up a united front. As Pam Brown says “When sisters stand shoulder to shoulder, who stands a chance against us? “

And so it has always been with the three of us.  We live far apart but yet are always there in thoughts for each other.  I wrote a poem to my younger sister to tell her (and you) how much I appreciated her.  I wrote a blog about both sisters early in my blog writing career.  I love and honour them both and wish that we could spend more time together.  But it is not to be unfortunately.

I wish that we could share our daily lives with each other.  I wish that they could accompany Lotte and me on our walks around this city.  I wish that I could introduce them to my friends.  I wish, I wish …

But we rely on emails and phone calls to keep our relationship with each other strong.  Commiserations to those of you who don’t know the special bond that exists between sisters.

Mother and girls

Mother with her three daughters

“We each hear different drummers,
but still find music to dance together.”
Judith Baxter
, Sister, friend and confidante
1938 –

A Year of Firsts

‘It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,’ the Queen remarked.
Lewis Carroll , Through the Looking Glass.

The year was 1956 – how long ago I hear you gasp.  And are there really people alive today who can remember that far back?  Well yes and I am one of them.

Several things that happened that year make the year stand out as a Year of Firsts.

I had left school the year before and celebrated my 18th birthday in 1956.  The First Birthday now freed from the confines of school and so frightfully grown up and independent  – although still living at my parents’ house as one did in those far off days.  No flatting for us!

Nat King Cole

Nat King Cole 1919 - 1965

A few days before my birthday I became Engaged to be married.  So, First Engagement.  Nat King Cole sang ‘Too Young” but 2 eighteen year olds knew better.  We had a great party inviting all our friends and relations, as I was the first one amongst the cousins to become engaged.  I sported a very large 5 diamond ring and thought I was just the happiest girl in the world.

However, we were Too Young and the engagement fizzled out quite soon and the next year I met and married my Dashing Young Scotsman.

Royal Opera House

via Wikipedia

My fiance’s mother and stepfather were classical music aficionados while my parents were more light, contemporary musicals.  So that year with his parents,  I saw my First Opera at Covent Garden aka The Royal Opera House  and my First Classical Music Concert at the Royal Albert Hall.  And I shall be forever grateful to these two people for introducing me to both opera and classical music.

Dancing class

Dancing class from my sister

I had been very keen on ballet having studied for many years.  So I  had seen a couple of ballets but they took me on my First Visit to Saddlers Wells.  At that time, Saddlers Wells was synonymous with the ballet.  Since that time the The Royal Opera House has been home to both the ballet and the opera.

Nut cutlets

My fiance’s mother and step-father were vegetarians.  This was very rare some 45 years ago and there were very few vegetarian restaurants.  Fiance’s mother was very resourceful and always managed to find a vegetarian restaurant close by the venue.  So then my First Visit to a Vegetarian Restaurant and my First taste of nut cutlets.  One must remember that nobody was experimenting with vegetarian food then and it was bland, tasteless, uninspiring and uninviting.  It certainly didn’t convert me to vegetarianism.

So in all 1956 stands out as a year of firsts and though I have moved on so far since those far off days, I still remember the visits to the opera, orchestra and ballet with those people.  Incidentally, even though I broke off the engagement my ex-fiance, my Dashing Young Scotsman and I remained friends for many years.  I wonder what happened to him.

But 1956 was not just a big year for me.  Here are some of the other things (rather more world shattering and changing) that happened that year :

  1. John Lennon (15) & Paul McCartney (13) meet for 1st time as Lennon’s rock group Quarrymen perform at a church dinner.
  2. 85th British Golf Open: Peter Thomson shoots a 286 at Hoylake England
  3. Last Ringling Bros, Barnum & Bailey Circus under a canvas tent
  4. Egypt seizes Suez Canal and British government  sends 3 aircraft carriers to Egypt
  5. England retain cricket Ashes, Jim Laker 46 wickets in the series
  6. Tanks are deployed against racist demonstrators in Clinton, Tennessee
  7. Great Britain performs nuclear test at Maralinga Australia
  8. Stravinsky’s “Canticum Sacrum,” premieres in Venice
  9. First transatlantic telephone cable goes into operation (Scotland/Canada)
  10. England’s first large-scale nuclear power station opens
  11. 16th modern Olympic games opens in Melbourne, Australia
  12. Nelson Mandela & 156 others arrested for political activities in South Africa
  13. Japan admitted to UN
  14. Montgomery, Ala, removed race-based seat assignments on its buses
  15. Elvis Presley’s “Don’t Be Cruel/Hound Dog,” single goes to #1 & stays #1 for a record 11 weeks (for a single)
  16. Abigail Van Buren’s “Dear Abby” column 1st appears in newspapers
  17. Britain abolishes death penalty
  18. “My Fair Lady” opens at Mark Hellinger Theater NYC for 2,715 performances
  19. Soap operas “As the World Turns” & “Edge of Night” premiere on TV
  20. Grace Kelly marries Prince Ranier III of Monaco.

Do you have a year of particular memories, firsts or whatever that makes it stand out?  I would love to hear from you.

The First Time I Saw Paris

Pont Alexandre

Via Wikipedia

“The last time I saw Paris
Her heart was warm and gay
I heard the laughter of her heart in every street cafe
The last time I saw Paris
Her trees were dressed for spring
And lovers walked beneath those trees
And birds found songs to sing..”

I woke up this morning thinking of Paris.  Did I dream of it in the night or was it just a random thought.  And then I opened this post from Hallysan at Photographic Memories and just knew that I had to write about that city today.

I have been to Paris several times over the years and really love it.

I have touched on seeing Charles Aznavour in Paris, but let’s go back to the beginning.

As a 15-year-old school girl and part of the French class, I was given the opportunity to visit Paris.  I was so excited.  I had barely even been out of London then – oh the usual annual holidays to the seaside but really no further than Southend-on-Sea.  Money was short at home but somehow my parents managed to let me go on the trip.  I probably begged and hassled them until they gave in.  Seriously though, they wanted the best opportunities for their girls.

I remember going to have the passport photos taken and then after a couple of weeks, going to Petty France to pick up the passport. This is where the Passport Office was located all those years ago.  The Passport Office was relocated in 2002.

I clearly remember turning up to school in school uniform to board the bus.  I think we probably wore our uniform for the whole time we were away .  It was June 1953 – how very long ago and you ask can anybody really be that old?  We were very smug watching the other girls going into the school grounds and envying us.  So we were off.  The bus (which we called a coach at the time) took us to Dover and then we were on the Cross Channel Ferry to Calais.  What excitement.  Can you imagine the 20 or so 15 year olds going on a ferry ride for the first time?  I wonder how our teacher and her one assistant coped.

I don’t remember where we spent the night but I am sure we didn’t drive on to Paris that night – it’s some 470 miles.

We arrived in Paris – that glorious city and what a marvel to my young eyes.    Cars travelling on the wrong side of the road, smart people moving around, we passed the sights of Paris which I had only read about up to then.  And then we arrived at our lodgings. This was a school closed for the summer holidays.  We were shown into a long dormitory with curtains around each bed.  What an adventure.  I had never stayed away from home before.  But what a commotion when the teacher discovered that the custodian, an old man by my standards, was to sleep in the dormitory too.  She couldn’t have that and so set about finding us some other accommodation. Not easy as people had begun to take trips after the war that had recently ended.

I don’t know how she managed but three of us were put into a small hotel and pretty much left to our own devices for the next couple of hours.  Across from the hotel was a fire station and we watched these gorgeous young men going about their business.  I have always had a thing about firemen since.

We stayed in that hotel for the time we were in Paris.  We were taken to the Louvre and I shall never forget the first glimpse of the Mona Lisa, that wonderful painting by da Vinci.  I have been back several times just to revisit it.  We of course, went up the Eiffel Tower, saw but couldn’t enter the Moulin Rouge.  We visited Notre Dame and Les Invalides.  We traversed Pont Alexandre and the Champs Elysee.

Champs Elysees

Champs Elysees via Wikipedia

On one glorious day we had a trip to Giverny and saw the works of Claude Monet.  This was my first introduction to this wonderful painter and over the years I have collected many prints of his work.  Perhaps one day when I win the lottery…

Water Garden at Giverny

Via Wikipedia

Then, all too soon, the trip was over and it was back to dull, dreary London.  It was still dull and dreary after the long war we had just survived.  But the trip had sown in me the love of Paris and I returned, as I have said several times later.

I believed in love at first sight then (and still do) and that city totally captivated this 15-year-old and has held her in thrall ever since.  I most certainly do Love Paris and as I have said, I have returned several times over the years.

Perhaps another post?

“In Paris you learn wit, in London you learn to crush your social rivals and in Florence you learn poise”
Virgil Thompson, American composer,
1896 – 1989

Car Troubles

When I was pregnant with my son, my Father in Law bought me a car.  This was way back in 1962 and I thought I was the ‘bees knees’.   The only set back was that I didn’t have a driving licence.

I have gone on and on about the three driving tests I took and this was the first.  I passed and I don’t know who was the most pleased to return to the driving centre, me or the tester.

Austin A40

This photo sent to me by a friend. My A40 was white.

Anyway, this was a 2 year old Austin A40.  Thoroughly checked out and deemed suitable, particularly as it had been previously owned by the Sheriff of the county.  This was Scotland and they have different names for different positions.

Now fast forward two years.  My Father-in-Law decided to upgrade my car and purchased a brand new A40 for me.  How proud I was of that car.  Nobody in my family had ever owned a new car and I suppose I was a little above myself over this

The car ran beautifully (mostly) but on one memorable occasion driving to London to visit my parents – some 400 miles – the gas tank sprang a leak.  Apparently a stone had been thrown up and caused a hole.  Well it was late at night and of course no chance of getting it fixed so my husband had this great idea.  We were all, children included, given a pack of gum and told to chew it so that it could be made into a wad to seal the hole.  The children had never been given gum before and thought it was a great hoot.  The gum held until we arrived at my parents and the next day the hole was repaired.  Or maybe the gas tank was replaced it was a long time ago and that part of the story is lost in the mist of time.

Of rather more concern was the tendency to suddenly stop.  Not being mechanically minded then or even now, I didn’t know what caused this.  The garage told me that when it happened I should get out of the car and give a certain part of the engine (well, I am blonde so what do I know) a thump with the heel of my shoe and the air lock, blockage or whatever would move.  And it worked every time.

At that time in the winter months, my husband used to get the train to Edinburgh each morning, some 45 miles away.  I used to drive him to the station for an early morning train and most morning simply did so in my robe, with the children in their nightwear in the back of the car.

Alas, one cold, winter morning, almost before the sun was up, on the way back from the station the car stopped.  Well here I was in a quandary.  I had to get out of the car to hit the thing and I was in my nightwear.  To make matters worse I had stopped outside the local Police Station and the shift changeover was happening.  I duly got out of the car to do my thing and was immediately surrounded by a group of policemen all offering to help.  I explained what had to be done and they duly did it for me.  Then I drove home but I imagine several of them dined out on the story of this young blonde in her nightie outside the police station.  And I was on first name terms with most of the local police force for the rest of the time that we lived there.

Shortly after that the car was sold.

And I should like to thank my blogging buddy at counting ducks once again for the inspiration for today’s blog.

The one thing that unites all human beings, regardless of age, gender, religion, economic status or ethnic background, is that, deep down inside, we ALL believe that we are above average drivers.  ~Dave Barry,
“Things That It Took Me 50 Years to Learn”

And Today’s Offers…

Yesterday I received an email from a very good friend that included some of the funniest aka craziest ads that ever were promulgated published.

Toothache drops

Why is everybody rushing to the shop?

Cruise

Wouldn't this go down well today?

And do you want to lose some weight?  Try some of these – but remember the tape worms have been ‘sanitized’.

Weight loss posterVitamins

Or feeling a bit lethargic?  Try a few of these they will immediately buck you up.

Husband and wife

And do you have a new baby?  These will most certainly help

Baby and colaMother and baby

And when you visit the doctor with your baby remember

Doctors smoking

Wish listAnd gentlemen.  Do you have a problem on deciding on a gift for your wife, particularly at Christmas.  Worry no more.  The answer is here.

Vacuum cleaner

Smoking

And if you don't have a wife, here's a sure fire way to attract that woman of your dreams

Kenwood chef

And gals - just in case you've ever wondered

And did we really believe these  ads?  Were we really so gullible? Certainly as a new young wife I thought the house had to be perfectly presented, the children had to be perfectly behaved but I never ever accepted a household appliance as a gift – Christmas or otherwise.  But these ads while giving us a chance to laugh show just how far we have come in 50 plus years.

Which is your favourite one. No prizes will be offered but I should just like to know.  My favourite is the tape worms.  I really wonder if people bought them sanitized or not.

Note – I have assumed that as these images have been circulating freely around the internet that they are outside copyright.  If this is not the case then I apologise wholeheartedly for any misuse.


Ode to a Sister

“Regrets I’ve had a few
But then again too few to mention
I did what I had to do
And saw it through without exemption”
From My Way sung by Frank Sinatra.

I think as we look back on our lives there are always some regrets.  The road not taken; the decision not made; the opportunity missed.  For me one of my regrets is time not having been spent with family.  Because I moved to the other side of the world I know that I missed out on lots of celebrations but also missed out on shouldering some responsibilities.

Thinking about this today I came up with this “Ode to a Sister”

I am not there when you call out my name
I am not there when you need a sister’s help
I am not there when things go wrong
And you need a shoulder to cry on.
I am not there

I am not there to celebrate the births of grandchildren
Or the marriage of your daughter
I am not there to see your children thriving and
I am not there to see their children growing

I am not there when decisions on mother’s care must be made
I am not there to assure you that the decisions are right
I am not there when mother dies and you have to deal with it
Alone until we came from far away

I am not there to help you cope with father’s aging
I am not there to help make  decisions on his care
I am not there when he dies and again you deal with it
I am not there.

I am not there when more decisions must be made
Dealing with the trappings of our parents lives
Unknown things about them surface
And I am not there.

I am not there to celebrate 21st birthdays
Or special birthdays of your own
I am not there when a special friend dies
I am not there.

I am not there when riots flare around you
And scared you sit alone in your flat
I am not there to hug you and say you will be safe
I am not there.

But I am there always with you
In thoughts and memories that we share
I will always be your loving sister
I am there.

I wrote this as stream of consciousness and it is published just as I wrote it.  so it’s from the heart.

Sisters are very special  and I have said this so many times before.  But before I get mawkish about my sisters, one in London and one in Los Angeles, I shall end this post.

Mother and girls

Mother with her three daughters

“Sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters – never had to have a chaperone, “No sir” – I’m here to keep my eye on her.”  Irving Berlin 1988-1989.
Composer and lyricist