Tag Archives: musing

One Day

This is where it all begins.
Everything starts here, today.”

David Nicholls, One Day 

Have you said to yourself One Day I shall

  • Start to exercise and lose this excess weight
  • Read a book of fiction rather than for a reason – self-help, weight loss or whatever
  • Reconnect with that friend to whom I haven’t spoken since we had that disagreement
  • Go to the sea
  • Take a trip
  • Talk to my neighbour
  • Begin my walks
  • Finish my …..?

Well, today is that One Day.

  • We can start by leaving the car behind and taking the walk to the store.  This can also be your exercise for the day.
  • Or take a trip to the library.  The librarian will be happy to discuss recent books with you and help you choose just the right one for you.
  • Pick up the phone and call that friend.  Someone has to make the first move and someday that person may no longer be with us.
  • Call the neighbour and ask her/him over for a cup of coffee.

Today the sun is shining, or at least it will have risen even if it is hiding behind the clouds.  Celebrate today it will never come again.  And at the end of the day, how I hate that expression but here I mean it literally, when you look at your To Do List and see what you have accomplished you will be glad you decided this was to be the One Day.

Butterflies

And of course, my favourite Mary Oliver quote (are you bored with this one yet?)

“Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?”
― Mary Oliver

Thinking of Moving?

Several years ago – well 5 actually – I wrote a couple of posts about houses/homes with a difference.  The Water Tower was one such and subsequently, I received an email from the woman who bought the tower and was making her home there.  Unfortunately, she didn’t respond to my request for photos of the finish.  And another time I wrote about Castles for sale.

Well during a cold autumn day, while reading the newspaper I came across an article on ancient Italian buildings for sale.  From ancient castles, monasteries, convents, and towers to old farmhouses, schools and inns, over 100 properties are being given away for free by the State Property Agency which has joined with the Ministry of Cultural Heritage to carry out the new scheme, under which the country’s majestic yet dilapidated properties are handed over free of charge to entrepreneurs who commit to restoring  them to their original splendour and open them to the public as restaurants, hotels or spas.

Successful bidders will be given a 9-year lease with the possibility to extend it for a further 9-years.

We are told, “Successful applicants will be given an ‘Art Bonus’, available through a government scheme launched in 2015 which grants tax breaks on art-related charitable donations, such as for the maintenance and restoration of historic buildings.”

italy-Puglia_Barletta_Villa Bonelli_Via Francigena-large

Abandoned Castle in Puglia

 

italy-Puglia_Barletta_Scuola rurale_via Francigena-large

Abandoned Rural School in Puglia

So if the idea of living in a castle, monastery or old school appeals, you have until June 26 to make an offer.

More information from The Telegraph here.

“I’ve got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I
can unlock the door remains to be seen.”
From Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, 1832-1888

Note photos courtesy of The Telegraph.

 

 

I’m English; I drink Tea; I ask.

A couple of months ago I mentioned my strawberry tea set. And today we had tea but not in my tea set, rather in delightful Rosenthal cups.

teaset1

Can anyone tell me why tea tastes so much better when drunk from a thin, bone china cup?  Even a bone china mug is not as good. This is just one of several problems on my mind today.

And why does it seem OK to have a “toes up” in the afternoon when you are away from home but not when you are at home?

Can anyone tell me why tidying dishes etc around someone else’s kitchen seems less onerous than when doing the same chores at home?

And why when you are away from home, do the shops have a better choice of things than your local shops?

And why is the sky bluer, the sun warmer, the air clearer, the waves better and the sea more inviting, when you are away?

Vintage?

 

 

 

vinage-car

Downloaded from Pinterest

Are you lucky enough to own a car like this?  I have never owned one that was more than 5 years old but can appreciate the beauty in this one and others like it.  Close to where we live is the world renowned Southwards Car Museum and I often used to take my son and later the grandsons there when they were younger.

Owners of these beauties really care for them.  They are certainly pampered.  Kept in a warm dry garage away from the vagaries of the weather; they are regularly cleaned and polished, their motors serviced; primped and polished they are very well cared for.

Well now, I’ve become vintage.  I too am kept in a warm dry house (rather than a garage) away from the vagaries of the weather.  I’m cleaned, polished and primped.  I have regular services, hairdressers, facials, manicures, pedicures, dentists and the occasional visit to the GP.

We all know that with regular servicing and maintenance, cars can perform well for many years after their manufacture and so I plan to keep up the servicing and maintenance of me.

Looking on Google for a quote as I have nothing in my many books, I came across this.

“Recent generations seem to consider ‘old-fashioned’ thinking
as out-dated
and without place in the modern world.
I beg to differ. After all, who has greater faith?
He who looks to and learns from the past,
or the man who cares not for consequence?”
― Fennel HudsonA Meaningful Life – Fennel’s Journal – No. 1

Now off to find out some more about this author.

Wet, Windy, Wellington Wednesday

“Instructions for living a life Pay attention.  Be astonished.  Tell about it.”

Mary Oliver

Today I have read several posts on August in the Northern Hemisphere.  Picnics, walks, swims and holidays seem to be on the minds of most of you.  But it’s winter here.

weather2

And how easily we are fooled.  Having been lulled into a false sense of security with days of mild, almost windless weather we woke up this morning to a typical winter’s day here in Wellington.

The rain fell out of the sky and the wind moaned and shook trees and roofs around our Capital City.

We know that Wellington is the most Windy City in the world.  Yes, it even beats Chicago.  We regularly (how often?) have gale force winds but hey, this all adds to the wind power that generates the turbines around the city.

According to The Telegraph reporter Karl Mathieson on October 15, 2015 “Judging which is the world’s windiest city is tricky, as no global database for cities exists and measurement techniques are not standardised. Other contenders include Rio Gallegos and Punta Arenas in Argentina and Chile’s windswept southern Patagonia. St John’s in Canada is north America’s windiest city,”

Wellington’s Acting Mayor Justin Lester waxes effusive over the benefits of Wellington’s windy record.  “Sailors, windsurfers and kite-surfers come from afar to ride the vortex. Air pollution is non-existent as any fumes are whipped away and wind power is harnessed for electricity.

Perhaps the best thing of all, it breeds a bunch of sturdy, resilient Wellingtonians who aren’t fazed by a little bit of wind.” he says

And we are told by those who know, that this weather is set to continue for the rest of the week.  So what shall I be doing?

Drink tea

Looking forward to it.

And from Percy Bysshe Shelley in Ode to the West Wind

“If winter comes, can spring be far behind?”
― 

 

Musing and Meandering

“In a world where thrushes sing and willow trees are golden in the spring, boredom should have been included among the seven deadly sins.”
― Elizabeth Goudge, English author of romance novels, short stories and children’s books. 1900-1984

The rush and bustle of the holiday season has for me at least, calmed down. But of course, for most of New Zealand this is holiday time, the time for the family’s annual vacation.

When I first came to New Zealand oh so many years ago, the whole place shut down for at least two weeks over this time. Every business closed on Christmas Eve and apart from retail outlets all businesses stayed closed until well into the New Year. Very frustrating for a newcomer. Now of course, business is as usual except for the statutory holidays – Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and the following one. Retailers operate on every day except Christmas Day.

So if I’m not on holiday (although when one is retired each day is a holiday) what am I doing? Well at last I have seen the end of the interminable/innumerable packing boxes from my move. This has been the most difficult of all 20 plus moves I have made in my life. The moving was exacerbated by the fact that I was moving into a much smaller space. But now that is done and the Salvation Army has been the recipient of many things that I am sure will be of use to others.

The living room is looking more like home and I know that I can be happy here. Of course, added to this is the benefit of having my daughter and her two teenage boys in the house too.

So I looked around for something to do. I tried my hand at staining an old bookcase and am pleased to say that it turned out quite well. I then started on an old table that had suffered severe water damage from a plant having been placed upon it. That too turned out well. Now my daughter and her boys are running from me in case I try to stain them or any of their belongings.

It’s a good thing I tackled that job on New Year’s Day because since then it has rained almost non stop.

On Christmas Eve the SKY TV man eventually came and installed the television. Lucky for me as today has been mostly catching up on programmes interspersed with catching up on my reading.

Perhaps when I’m thinking of things for which to be grateful today’s rainfall will feature. It certainly will for the farmers in the South Island who are facing drought conditions this early in the summer season.

So nothing much changes in my writing. I write on anything and everything that comes into this aged mind. Until tomorrow dear friends, and thank you for reading my meanderings.

A-New-Book-With-Blank-Pages

This particularly  for Chris and Donna