Category Archives: Words

Synchronicity, Serendipity or Coincidence.

 

 

Synchron

 

Definition – the simultaneous occurrence of events which appear
significantly related but have no discernible causal connection.

I recently read a post from my dear friend/sister of choice Chris at Bridges Burning.  She wrote about serendipity and how three people, she in Ontario, my sister in the UK and me in New Zealand,  can connect over a comment on Skype.  The comment and the thoughts that preceded and followed it bounced around the world.  It went from Kitchener, Ontario to Wellington, New Zealand and then on to Oxford in the United Kingdom.

The definition of Serendipity is – the occurrence and development of events by
chance in a happy or beneficial way.

Serendipity and synchronicity are quite different words, often confused and should be used differently.  For instance, it would not have been correct for Chris to use synchronicity in her telling but it is correct when we both write about the same thing in a blog post.  Or when I send an email saying we should Skype only to find that she has sent the exact email to me.

How often we find this synchronicity.   I remember years ago when training to be a Life Coach.  I had read one day about Sedona in Arizona, the red rocks and the general feeling of spiritual well-being, the artists and healers who flock there, and so determined that I should go there in the not too distant future.  The course was conducted on a phone link of 2 hours each Monday evening.  Soon after I logged in I heard one of the other participants talking about a visit he had made to Sedona the previous year and how he was planning on returning the next year for the Sedona Film Festival.

My mind/imagination was captured by this place and then the next morning, in an email from my sister in Los Angeles, she said she thought the next time I visited we should go to Sedona as she had heard such great things about it.

Well didn’t that exactly meet the definition –  significantly related but have no discernible causal connection?

Recently, because it was the anniversary of the death of The Architect, I was thinking about him and about the firm he had established many years ago.  Later that day I was at the Hospice and learned that it is his old firm that will be doing the architectural work for the new hospice building. Serendipity at work again.

I say that there is no such thing as coincidence, but do I really believe that?  There is definitely synchronicity, serendipity and probably there is room for coincidence too.

The definition of Coincidence is – a striking occurrence of two or more events
at one time 
apparently by mere chance:

Several years ago I was in London for the weekend.  The elderly woman for whom I was playing companion went off to a wedding which left me free.  It just so happened that friends were visiting London from NZ and we decided to meet up.  The first evening we went around the corner from the apartment looking for some place to have a drink and decide where to eat.  Imagine my surprise when, on turning the corner I saw three friends, a couple from Auckland, NZ and one from Sydney, Australia.  I hadn’t seen any of these people for several years, so their being in London at just that particular weekend was certainly a coincidence.

And for you – stop for a moment and ask yourself, what coincidences have been happening in my life recently that I am not paying attention to? Where do I need to be seeing the truth? What is the Universe trying to tell me?

And consider this –

If there were no such thing as coincidence,
there would be no such word
Heron Carvic (born Geoffrey Rupert William Harris)
English actor writer. 
  1913 –  1980 

 

By the way – if you are an Agatha Christie fan, hop over to my other site to read a review on A Talent for Murder.

 

 

 

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Petrichor

Another new word for me today.  You may know that I am a pluviophile – a lover of rain.

Pluviophile

I have written about walking in the rain several times in the past.  More particularly last year when the only independent way of getting around was to walk.

And today I found another new word Petrichor – the smell of the earth after the rain.

Wikipedia tells us “Petrichor (/ˈpɛtrkɔər/) is the earthy scent produced when rain falls on dry soil. The word is constructed from Greek πέτρα petra, meaning “stone”, and ἰχώρ īchōr, the fluid that flows in the veins of the gods in Greek mythology.”

 

I am sure you all know that smell.  It’s almost as if the earth is saying, OK time to wake up and start reproducing the flowers, trees, vegetables etc.  I love that smell and am so glad that I found the word.  But I do wonder when I shall use either or both of these words and in what context.

We haven’t had any rain for several days so I am sure I shall smell petrichor again soon and  I am sure that some of my friends in the Northern Hemisphere would welcome a little rain at present.

And now, as I don’t have anything else to share today, I shall go out for coffee with my daughter and then return to read more of your posts this afternoon.

But first, I shall drink this cup of tea.

IMG_1793

No matter how dark the night
we know that whatever happens,
the sun will rise tomorrow

and then all the shadows
will be chased away.”
Judith Baxter 1938 –

 

Sunrise

More New Words

“Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.” 
― Rudyard Kipling

I have always been mesmerised/entranced/spellbound by words and in this, I am joined by both my sisters.  I suspect this is because our father was similarly mesmerised/entranced/spellbound.

Words

Last week I came across the word multifarious and while I was sure I could guess at its meaning I looked it up.  It means having many varied parts or aspects.  And then a couple of days later, one of my sisters of choice, Chris at Bridges Burning posed a question that asked for one word to describe yourself.   Chris chose Flotsam as her word,  and Celi at the kitchen gardens chose eclectic, and I chose multifarious because I think it absolutely describes me. What word would you choose?

And then, my ever resourceful sister in Los Angeles came up with

I’m now trying to find a sentence in which to use this lovely word.  That is of course if I can work out how to pronounce it.

Note:   According to Stephen King

“Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus
is the wrong word.
There are no exceptions to this rule.”

And who am I to argue with the master?

And turning to the Oxford English I find that logophile is the noun to describe a lover of words.

 

 

 

The Eight

Those of you who have stuck with me for any length of time, know that I am obsessed with words and the English language. We all learn at a young age certain rules for spelling the words.  And probably the one that we all remember well after leaving our English classes far behind is I BEFORE E EXCEPT AFTER C.

But hang on, there are exceptions to the rule and the exceptions prove the rule.  Here I have to say that our English teacher, most appropriately named Miss English, told us that the comment was that exceptions probe the rule.  Which did you learn?

But wait, how does the exception prove the rule? Wouldn’t it do just the opposite? Doesn’t it prove that the rule does not hold for all cases and is therefore not a rule at all?

Today when noodling (my sister’s word) around the web I came across this.  And I just had to share it.

I Before E.jpg

Oh and another new word, just in case you aren’t impressed with The Eight.  Do you know this word?

Balter

Thanks to my sister in Los Angeles for this.  And as I said to her, I always thought I was the dancer in the family.Here endeth tody’s English lesson, except for this quote that I found once again noodling around the web.

Here endeth tody’s English lesson, except for this quote that I found once again noodling around the web.

 

Drawing on my fine command of the English language,
I said nothing.
Robert Charles Benchley.American humorist, and
newspaper columnist
1889-1945

 

Words and More Words

It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use long,
difficult words
but rather short, easy words like
“What about lunch?”

― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

Posted letters are few and far between these days as so many of us use email instead. So when I arrived home the other day to see an envelope with my name and address hand written, I became quite excited.  That is until I opened it and found a business card inside setting an appointment date with an Otolaryngologist.  Well, I had no idea what an Otolaryngologistt did so I went to our trusty friend Google to find that it is is an ear nose and throat surgeon.  Suddenly the card and appointment made sense.  Since the accident my hearing has markedly declined and this was a follow up to a hearing test I had recently with an audiologist.

Note – I am now referring to the accident as my latest adventure.  Sounds better don’t you think and it gives me lots to look forward to.

Goofy-Riding-A-Bike Not ready for bike riding but who knows where this adventure will take me.

So another new word and yesterday while reading Elizabeth George’s novel Just One Evil Act I came across another word new to me -” ..that chain of thought led him ineluctably to the Pakistani professor…..”

The Oxford Dictionary tells me it is an adverb meaning inevitable, not to be escaped, impossible to avoid etc etc.  So we get the meaning and see how it fits in the Elizabeth George sentence.

By the way, are you a follower of her books.  They are about Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley of the Metropolitan Police and his side kick Sergeant Barbara Havers.  An amazing writer of whom I am totally in awe, and if you haven’t read any of her books I suggest you hurry off to your local library and pick up one.

Having returned from the mall where I had a facial and bought my own copy of Upwords, the game I play with my friend on Tuesday afternoons.  I can now introduce it to another friend who is almost housebound.

Upwords

I shall continue to read Elizabeth George’s book.I’m at page 493 of 719.  Will I finish it this afternoon?

book-tea

I found this on Pinterest. I hope I’m not impinging on anyone copyright.

 

Spring or the Ides of September

In the northern hemisphere you have unsettled weather in March and we have it here in September.

installing-sprng

Image stolen from Jeff    at jccsst-random.blogspot.co.nz

 

Well yesterday Wednesday)  I said we had all weather conditions in one day except snow, well today has made up for that.  We had a slight fall of snow here in Wellington but we also had hail.  And the Cook Straight Ferry sailings between the two islands have been cancelled all day.  Apparently thee were waves up to 6 metres at times and we have just been informed that the gale force winds reached 130 kmh.  Windy indeed.  Several roads have been closed for the day and we are being warned not to go out on the roads unless absolutely necessary.

So obviously walking was out of the question, instead a friend picked me up and we went into town for lunch and while she popped into her office for a short time, I took the opportunity to do some retail therapy.  See how well I am recovering.

And now continuing with my obsession with words Ive just been reading a  post  from September 9  2011 when i was very new to blogging and was writing every day.  How very disciplined I was then.  It was called Playing with words

Words

“Better than a thousand hollow words,
is one word that brings peace.

Buddha

 

In that post I commented onOnomatopoeia and  and came up with a word for each letter of the alphabet.  The comments were interesting as many of my followers like words andI love words.  I like the sound of them, I like to see them written down and I like to see them used by others in different ways and I just like playing with them.

See what you think of my alphabet.  Can you offer other words?  I’d love to hear from you.

 

Wet, Wild, Wellington Wednesday

weather2

“Pray don’t talk to me about the weather, Mr. Worthing.
Whenever people talk to me about the weather,
I always feel quite certain that they mean something else.
And that makes me quite nervous.”
― Oscar Wilde

Well, we were warned that it was to be a cold wet and windy day.  Apparently there is a southerly storm creeping across the country and nowhere will be immune from it’s effects.  I guess that’s one of the things about living in a small long and narrow country.  Sometimes one just can’t get away from the storm.

Well, as you know I’m a pluviophile and I’m English and like walking in the rain so I got ready for today’s walk.  But discretion took over.  The wind is close to gale force at present and I was told in no uncertain terms to say inside.  So that I did and no walking today.

———-

But today was supposed to be called A Word on Wednesday.  You all know how I love words and get very excited when I find a new one.  Well yesterday I found one –

Peregrinate – to travel or journey especially on foot.  Henry James had this to say about peregrinate – “But I seem to travel, to peregrinate less and less and so I am reduced to living on my past accumulations” But not for me.  I propose to keep walking and finding ever new places to see.

———-

And now after lunch with a friend it’s 4pm and the sun is shining.  The only thing we haven’t had today in Wellington is snow, but we are promised the gale force southerly tonight, so who knows.

And just because I love this, I offer it to you.

Savour Kindness PG museum

The plaque at the entrance to the Peggy Guggenheim Museum, Venice

 

Words

Are you a cruciverbalist?  I am.  I always thought this was a designer of crossword puzzles but now I understand ( after looking it up on our trusty Wikipedia) that it can also apply to an enthusiast of word games and of crossword puzzles.

I have played word games, with my father and sisters, since I was young.  My father did crosswords well into his 90s even though he was officially determined as blind.

Words have power. In ancient times spoken words created worlds, creatures, and human beings to educate and amuse their listeners.  Along with drawings this was the way that myths, stories and histories were passed down through the generations.  And still we love words and what they tell us, where they can transport us to  and what they can mean.

I have always been intrigued with words, how they sound and how they look on the page and what they actually mean.  And we know that words even though they sound  the same often have quite different meanings.  Think about :

  • Rain and reign.  They sound the same but have totally different meanings and are spelt quite differently too.
  • Their and there.  Again they sound the same but have different meanings.
  • Fore and four
  • Nay and neigh
  • Buy and bye
  • Here and hear
  • Saw and sore
  • Bare and bear

I know that the spoken word often betrays the area from where the speaker hails – and there is another examples hails and hales. For instance if I say what (concentrating on the wh sound) it will sound quite different to the way in which my NZ educated grandchildren will say it.  And I know you will be able to think of many instances yourself.  In this day of people moving freely around the world, bringing different cultures to play many English words are heard that sound different to our ears.

And many more.  But how clever to be able to design crosswords.  Not only does one have to derive the clues but also to have the letters form into words where the letters intersect and also in the full word.  I wish I were that clever.

The first page I turn to in the newspaper is always the puzzle page.  In our local paper we have 4 crosswords daily – one cryptic (that I never manage to get out) one two-speed that has both regular and cryptic clues, and this is my favourite, one daily which is a regular crossword and another daily that is slightly more difficult.  In addition to these we have a code cracker.  In this we are given one or two of the letters and have to complete the rest of the puzzle using these.  If you don’t have this in your newspaper click the link to see what it is.

So for any cruciverbalist there is plenty to keep us busy and happy.

“Colors fade, temples crumble, empires fall,
but wise words endure.”
Edward Thorndike,  1874 – 1949
American psychologist

A Lovely New Word and a Challenge

Lotte in bed

Just don’t go on about it. Pleonasm is tiring.

Yesterday at Today I Think Patricia gave us the definition of the word pleonasm: the use of more words than necessary to express an idea, redundancy.

In my comment I said I would now have to find a use for the word and Patricia responded to let her know when and how I could work it into a conversation.  Well, I am not one to shirk a challenge, so here goes.

Prime Minister John Key

Photo credit NZ Herald

“Mr Prime Minister (we don’t have a President here in NZ) I think you should gather all your troops together and give them a lecture on pleonasm.  The speeches are far too long and very boring.”

Pres Obama and Gov Brewer

Can’t find photo credit. It’s on so many sites.

“Madam, can you please just cut to the chase.  Pleonasm is tedious”.

Photo from habitsforahappyhome.wordpress.com/

“Mum, pleonasm is wasted on me.  Just tell me in a few words what I did wrong.”

I now have to ask Patricia “Are these examples OK?”

And everybody else, what could you do with this lovely new word PLEONASM.

And no words are required to describe my rainbow.

Rainbow

My rainbow

Words, Words and More Words

Words

Isaac Kaufmann Funk ( 1839 –  1912) was an American Lutheran minister, editor, lexicographer, publisher, and spelling reformer.    He is most well known for  The Standard Dictionary of the English Language published in 1893.   We are told via Wikipedia that “He worked with a team of more than 740 people.  His aim was to provide essential information thoroughly and simply at the same time. In order to achieve this he placed current meanings first, archaic meanings second, and etymologies last. ”

We know that he collaborated with his classmate, Adam Willis Wagnalls and the I K Funk company was renamed Funk and Wagnalls and the encyclopedia was renamed Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Encyclopedia in 1931.  It was later renamed New Funk & Wagnalls Encyclopedia, Universal Standard Encyclopedia, Funk & Wagnalls Standard Reference Encyclopedia, and Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia.quoted the best 10 words in the English language.as :

I read somewhere (?) that Isaac Funk considered the following the best ten words in the English language:

  • Mist
  • Hush
  • Luminous
  • Murmuring
  • Dawn
  • Chimes
  • Lullaby
  • Melody
  • Tranquil
  • Golden

These are in no particular order and I wonder how he arrived at this list of ten.  Certainly they are all gentle words with no harsh sounds or undertones.  Was he a gentle man looking to find equally gentle words?  I wonder

My choice of 10 words would be (again in no particular order):

  • Love
  • Gentle
  • Friendship
  • Family
  • Giving
  • Safety
  • Tranquil
  • Tenderness
  • Acceptance
  • Delight

What would your words be.  It’s fun to limit the choice to only 10.  Of course, there are many, many other words I could have chosen.  Why did I choose these?  They are all gentle words and maybe reflect where I am in my life’s journey now.

“But now the days grow short
I’m in the autumn of the year
And I think of my life as vintage wine
From fine old kegs
From the brim to the dregs
and it poured sweet and clear
It was a very good year”
As sung by Frank Sinatra – It Was a Very Good Year.

And for me, they have mostly been very good years!

And a final word today from the Greek philosopher Epicurus (341 BCE – 270 BCE)

“It is impossible to live a pleasant life without
living wisely and well and justly.
And it is impossible to live wisely and well
and justly without living a pleasant life.” 

Some recent posts on words –